Home   News Story (Page 2)

Tag Archives: teachers

My Family Week 2017 #MyFamilyWeek

Monday 16th to Sunday 22nd October 2017

My Family Week celebrates families of all shapes and sizes, allowing children to tell their own story, about their own family in their own voice.

My Family Week is a reflection on what family means in the modern world and is the brainchild of international Early Years trainer, author and consultant, Laura Henry, who has worked with children and their families for three decades.

My Family Week is celebrating the uniqueness of every family, using the characters from Laura’s popular children’s book series Jo-Jo and Gran-Gran as inspiration.
As part of the week, settings, schools, parents and wider families can take part in a range of activities to help children to tell their own stories.
Stories will be shared and developed online using a variety of social media platforms.

Support for My Family Week:

“I simply ADORE this idea! Families come in all shapes and sizes and celebrating diversity and variety means we accept and […]


GESS, Awards. Dubai, UAE

Delighted to be a judge at the GESS awards:

 


Home is home and school is school

I am delighted to hear that the charity Family and Childcare Trust has a dedicated Family Friendly Week. It is right to celebrate the family as a bedrock of society.

There are many pressures on family life: one of my ‘bug bears’ is homework!

My view is that in primary school homework should not be set. School is school and home is home! There is enough of a burden put on children from an early age with SATs in Years 7 and 11.

I have seen parents with their children doing homework on trains, in cars and even walking to school. Parents anecdotally comment that they have to rush back from family events to make sure homework is completed. Children getting into a state because they feel that their homework is not ‘good enough’.

When my boys were little, we had more fun visiting museums and other places of interest […]


Children don’t do Autumn, they do kicking leaves….

I came across an interesting blog on the wonderful land of Twitter, appropriately titled: ‘Are you addicted to Themes? A tale about themes, a Caterpillar and change.’

As with most of the inspiring blogs and other information I come across, I always share, this time via LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter. The majority of colleagues agreed with Denita’s analysis of ‘no themes’, with a few saying they still use themes and topics to make sure that children have variety. My view is that Educators who still hold on to the security blanket of themes, do so as a result of pedagogy practice within their Early Years professional development, in particular how they learned to emotionally connect with and to […]


Philosophical Play in the Early Years Setting

Communicating with children and interpreting their play and language requires skill and a sensitive approach. Therefore it gives me pleasure to have Sara Stanley, who supports children by using a philosophical approach, as my guest blogger

Sara is a registered level 1 SAPERE Trainer and National and International keynote speaker. She runs workshops, in service training and courses in Philosophy for Children (P4C) and enabling enquiry based classroom environments. She is also involved in long term projects working in Early Years settings in South African townships, working with Nali’Bali, PRAESA, the University of Cape Town and the DG Murray Trust.

Sara writes:

 “It could be said that children are at their most philosophical in their formative years. If you take Socrates’ provocation that “All I know is that I know nothing” then we see everything as new and puzzling. To a child the whole world is a new and strange place; a place where some things make perfect […]


Supporting our most vulnerable children

I am a firm believer that children deserve a holistic education, in which we educate their mind, body and soul.

The late great Nelson Mandela, famously quoted: ‘Educating the mind without educating the heart is no education at all.’

With this in mind, I am therefore pleased to have Jane Evans as my guest blogger. Jane has built up a wealth of parenting and early-years knowledge throughout her career as a parenting worker for a domestic violence organisation, a respite foster carer, a childminder, a children’s practitioner in a family centre and a support worker in a child-protection team, whilst also working in and with schools and pre-schools.

She now uses this as the basis for her writing, speaking and the training she delivers on attachment in early years, on parenting and children affected by trauma ‘Tuning In To Children and Parenting Beyond Trauma’.

Jane writes:         

“I am passionate about Early Years, its where my […]


Made In Chelsea: Literally!

I am very excited to share that I will be leading a training session at the world renowned Chelsea Open Air Nursery School.

Delegates will have the opportunity to have a tour of the amazing learning environment at Chelsea Open Air Nursery.

Image copyright Chelsea Open Air Nursery

Topic:

Building Parent Partnerships and Championing the Home Learning Environment

Share research about the benefits for the child of positive parent partnerships and a strong home learning environment
Ways to support families to understand that they play a vital role in their child’s education
Listening to parents and valuing their voices
Links to EYFS as it is now a crucial part of the curriculum
What do we currently do? What could we do? How can we promote it? How can we make it meaningful?

Date: Monday 6th January 2014

Time: 9:30am – 12:30pm

Investment: ONLY £30:00 per person!

Places are limited, so please book […]


The whole thing’s daft, I don’t know why – to teach or not to teach?

I delivered an inset day training session recently to a nursery group. The session was called: ‘Are you listening to me? Really, listening to me?’  In short, looking how educators need to be tuned into children in order to effectively support them with their learning and development.

One of the delegates, who I know from previous training and who follows me on Twitter, said: ‘Laura, I know your son works for Arsenal. What does he do? Love Thierry Henry, best player Arsenal had. If your son ever meets him, please ask for a photograph and autograph!’

I then burst out into The Thierry Henry song. I am an Arsenal supporter as well and I remember going to a game and singing the ‘Thierry song’, loud and clear with the rest of the fans!

She then went on to say how a child in the nursery was an Arsenal supporter and that […]


We Are The World!

One of my key times within early years has been attending the World Forum on Early Care and Education events which take place at different locations around the world every few years.

The next said conference will be in San Juan, Puerto Rico, May 6th – 9th 2014.

Of all the conferences that I have attended, I have found the World Forum to be the most profound, informative and inspirational, with a massive positive impact on my practice.  Listening to the world renowned Professor Stuart Shanker, bespoke presentation on brain development, and Professor Lillian Katz’s talks regarding her lifelong commitment to early childhood education were truly inspirational. Oh, and by the way, Lillian and I made the connection that we both attended Oxford Gardens, Primary School, in Kensington, London! To be able to share ideas and connect with colleagues regarding their early years practice is indeed a privilege. I’ve met colleagues from India, Nigeria and Australia, to […]


Whose Voice Should We Listen To?

On Twitter I follow Huffington Post Parents and I read a tweet with the introduction, ‘Parents of a 7yr old boy in a wheelchair were shocked when they saw his class picture…’  With such a headline I had to click to read the article in full. Please read the article to get the background information on this story.

Like most people reading this, I was shocked by this story and then reflected on a few points.

The mother said the image was discriminatory. The father’s view was that although it was upsetting and hurtful the photographer and/or school did not intentionally discriminate against their son.

The photograph was retaken and this time Miles was sat on the bench with his peers. An expert on disability found this to still show a lack of awareness of Miles, as the wheelchair is part of him. Miles’s father commented that when he […]